Doomsday Clock is now just 2½ minutes to ‘midnight’

Doomsday Clock is now just 2½ minutes to ‘midnight’

The Doomsday Clock has just advanced, virtually bringing earthlings just 2½ minutes to ‘midnight,’ the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists warned.

Scientists behind the so-called Doomsday Clock announced Thursday that it was adjusting the countdown to the “End of it All” by advancing the clock’s hands 30 seconds closer to midnight.

With just 2½ minutes to the midnight, the clock is now closest to the doomsday since 1953, when the U.S. had tested its first thermonuclear bomb and was followed by the Soviet Union’s hydrogen bomb test.

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Ancient, scary specimen placed in a new scientific order

Ancient, scary specimen placed in a new scientific order

A recently discovered well-preserved 100-million-year-old insect is so different from already identified more than one million insects that a new scientific order has been created to describe it.

The alien-looking specimen was discovered by a team of researchers from Oregon State University in semi-precious stone amber. It has a triangular head, almost-alien appearance along with so unusual features that scientists have called its discovery as "incredibly rare" event.

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Ancient explosion of ocean life wasn’t triggered by space rock bombardment: study

Ancient explosion of ocean life wasn’t triggered by space rock bombardment: study

Explosion of ocean life nearly 471 million years ago, known as the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE), wasn’t triggered by a meteorite bombardment of Earth, an international team of researchers found in a new study.

Challenging the widely-accepted theory, the new study by researchers from Sweden and Denmark suggested that the ancient ocean creature expansion started roughly 2 million years before the space rock bombardment.

Debris created by prehistoric space collision still falling on Earth

Debris created by prehistoric space collision still falling on Earth

A Connecticut-sized space rock’s collision with another object millions of years ago sent shrapnel raining down on Earth; and even today, they make up the biggest group of meteorites that land on our planet.

That 466-miillion-year-old collision, which is considered to be the biggest cataclysm to occur in our celestial neighborhood in nearly 3 billion years, broke the large space rocks into millions of pieces. Those pieces continued to slam into one another, creating more debris.

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