Evidence pinpointing expected acceleration of sea-level rise due to climate change was hidden behind 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption

Evidence pinpointing expected acceleration of sea-level rise due to climate chan

According to a latest study, appeared in the journal Scientific Reports, the proof pinpointing probable acceleration of sea-level increase because of climate change was hidden behind the consequences of Mount Pinatubo’s eruption in 1991.

The eruption that year released tens of millions of tons of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere, which probably shielded the impact of industrial pollution on global sea levels over the twenty years since then.

John Fasullo, who performed the study along with scientists from the University of Colorado in Boulder and Old Dominion University, said that what they have demonstrated is that sea level acceleration is a reality and it’s continuously prevailing, and they have come to know why it isn’t seen in the short satellite record.

The information from satellite observations that scientists used for tracking sea-level increase started in 1993, a couple of years post the eruption, temporarily decreasing the temperature of the planet. The collected data suggested that the rate of sea-level rise was quite steady at roughly 3 millimeters per year.

Fasullo said, “When we used climate model runs designed to remove Pinatubo eruption effect, we saw rate of sea level rise accelerating in our simulations. Now impacts of Pinatubo have faded, this acceleration should become evident in satellite measurements in coming decade, barring another major volcanic eruption”.

A section of previous week’s opening Olympic ceremonies in Rio de Janeiro was completely dedicated to climate change. Footage provided a peep into climate change and an accompanying graphic demonstrated the invasion of sea-level rise on worldwide cities in case the average global temperature goes up by 3-4 degrees.

The Washington Post suggested that fitting probably, knowing the warming may boost outbreaks of mosquito-borne illnesses like Zika, which has spread its wings from Brazil to Florida, causing serious birth defects.

According to a report in Huffington Post by Tim Profeta, "A new study in the journal Scientific Reports suggests that the evidence to pinpoint expected acceleration of sea-level rise due to climate change was hiding behind the effects of a 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo."

"What we've shown is that sea level acceleration is real, and it continues to be going on, it's ongoing, and we understand why you don't see it in the short satellite record," said John Fasullo, who conducted the research along with scientists from the University of Colorado in Boulder and Old Dominion University.

"When we used climate model runs designed to remove the effect of the Pinatubo eruption, we saw the rate of sea level rise accelerating in our simulations," Fasullo said. "Now that the impacts of Pinatubo have faded, this acceleration should become evident in the satellite measurements in the coming decade, barring another major volcanic eruption."

A report published in Science World Report informed, "As the Earth heats up, the pace of sea level rise is also expected to quicken. This makes it harder for cities to stay above water. In 1992, scientists have studied the Earth's mean sea level via satellites and watched how it rise at a steady 3mm per year. However, since Mt. Pinatubo's volcanic eruption, no evidence for acceleration has been noted, Gizmodo reported."

Fasullo and his colleagues picked out signals from the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic eruption which occurred on June 15 1991. They discovered that aerosols from the eruption blocked enough sunlight and temporarily cooled the oceans. This caused sea levels to fall by about six millimeters.

Today, scientists already have their first firm evidence that the rate of sea level rise is quickening. However, Fasullo was reluctant to give an estimate on how quickly sea level rise will accelerate. He did not also estimate the volcanic eruption's total damage can cause at the end of the century.


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