Science

Nearly 4bn-year-old fossils might be earliest evidence of life on Earth

Nearly 4bn-year-old fossils might be earliest evidence of life on Earth

Straw-shaped microfossils discovered in ancient rocks in Canada could be evidence of some of the earliest life on Earth, a team of researchers led by biogeochemist Matthew Dodd reported.

Dodd, a biogeochemist at University College London, and colleagues said that the tiny, tubular structures or microfossils came from ancient microbes that existed on our planet nearly four billion years ago.

While the age of the specimens remains a matter of debate, most scientists believe that they are 3.77 billion years old, which make them the oldest ever found specimens.

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Overhyped ‘metallic hydrogen’ unbelievably disappears

Overhyped ‘metallic hydrogen’ unbelievably disappears

The world’s only sample of metallic hydrogen that was last month hyped as potentially revolutionizing technology has suddenly disappeared, scientists reported.

A team of physicists at Harvard University made a breakthrough last month when they created the first metallic hydrogen material by turning the gas into a metal. They described the metallic hydrogen as the “holy grail” of high-pressure physics.

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NASA might send humans to orbit the Moon again

NASA might send humans to orbit the Moon again

NASA’s next generation rocket Space Launch System (SLS) is currently scheduled to send an unmanned capsule to orbit the Moon, but the White House has asked the government-run space agency to look into the possibility of making the rocket’s debut launch a manned mission.

The White House has asked the space agency to take around a month to assess how much additional time, money and risk would be added to the SLS’ debut flight if a two-member crew is put on board.

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Goal to send humans to Mars gaining unprecedented support

Goal to send humans to Mars gaining unprecedented support

Children born in 2017 will be more likely than any previous generation to witness humans walking on another planet before their 18th birthday, Explore Mars CEO Chris Carberry said in a press release.

The goal to send humans to the Red Planet has been gaining unprecedented support from the U.S. Congress, the business world and academia; despite massive challenges lingering on the path to achieve the goal.

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