Health

Several developing ‘countries’ hidden within borders of USA: study

Several developing ‘countries’ hidden within borders of USA: study

The United States would look quite different if its fifty states were organized as per their residents’ income instead of geography because several states within the borders of the developed U.S. are still underdeveloped.

A team of researchers from Tennessee State University noted that the median household income for a family of four in the poorest state would have just above the federal poverty line if the states were organized as per their incomes. In addition, residents of the poorest state would be living shorter lives than people in at least half of the world’s countries.

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Insurance firms should be blamed for surprise doctor bills: ACEP

Insurance firms should be blamed for surprise doctor bills: ACEP

Many insurance companies are misleading patients by selling self-styled ‘affordable’ health policies that provide very little coverage until large deductibles are met, according to the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

ACEP President Dr. Rebecca Parker argued that insurance companies and not emergency room (ER) physicians should be blamed for ‘surprise’ medical bills that patients receive after ER visits.

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More women asking about IUDs after Trump’s victory

More women asking about IUDs after Trump’s victory

Amid increased concerns over the potential end of birth control services through the Affordable Care Act (ACA), more and more women are searching about long-lasting birth control methods like intrauterine devices (IUDs).

President-elect Donald Trump repeatedly vowed during his election campaign that he would scrap the ACA. He also proposed to punish women who opt for abortions as well as doctors who help in the procedure.

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Brain implant enables ‘locked-in’ ALS patient to communicate

Brain implant enables ‘locked-in’ ALS patient to communicate

A team of researchers in the Netherlands have successfully tested an implantable computer-brain interface that enabled the mind of a "locked-in" ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) patient to communicate through brain signaling.

ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects the patient's nerve cells in the brain as well as the spinal cord. It primarily attacks neurons that control voluntary muscles, such as those in the arms, legs and face.

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