Science

Tourists let baby dolphin die on Argentina beach

Tourists let baby dolphin die on Argentina beach

A baby dolphin died last Sunday after a mob of tourists dragged it from the sea of San Bernardo in Argentina and didn’t allow it to return to the water.

The beach where the baby dolphin died is located nearly 200 miles south of Buenos Aires. A footage posted on YouTube shows a number of tourists standing or kneeling around the small marine creature, petting it and taking selfies with it.

An observer said the crowd could have allowed the baby dolphin to return to the water while it was still breathing, but they let it die.

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UC Irvine team’s Hyperloop pod ready to race in SpaceX contest

UC Irvine team’s Hyperloop pod ready to race in SpaceX contest

A 50-member team of UC Irvine students is ready with its project to participate in the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition, which is scheduled to take place at the space firm’s headquarters in Hawthorne on Sunday.

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk announced the Hyperloop project, a concept for a really high-speed ground transport system, in 2013. When UC Irvine students heard about it, they started working on their own designs to build a prototype for future transportation system.

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Doomsday Clock is now just 2½ minutes to ‘midnight’

Doomsday Clock is now just 2½ minutes to ‘midnight’

The Doomsday Clock has just advanced, virtually bringing earthlings just 2½ minutes to ‘midnight,’ the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists warned.

Scientists behind the so-called Doomsday Clock announced Thursday that it was adjusting the countdown to the “End of it All” by advancing the clock’s hands 30 seconds closer to midnight.

With just 2½ minutes to the midnight, the clock is now closest to the doomsday since 1953, when the U.S. had tested its first thermonuclear bomb and was followed by the Soviet Union’s hydrogen bomb test.

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Ancient, scary specimen placed in a new scientific order

Ancient, scary specimen placed in a new scientific order

A recently discovered well-preserved 100-million-year-old insect is so different from already identified more than one million insects that a new scientific order has been created to describe it.

The alien-looking specimen was discovered by a team of researchers from Oregon State University in semi-precious stone amber. It has a triangular head, almost-alien appearance along with so unusual features that scientists have called its discovery as "incredibly rare" event.

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