Research

Ancient explosion of ocean life wasn’t triggered by space rock bombardment: study

Ancient explosion of ocean life wasn’t triggered by space rock bombardment: study

Explosion of ocean life nearly 471 million years ago, known as the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE), wasn’t triggered by a meteorite bombardment of Earth, an international team of researchers found in a new study.

Challenging the widely-accepted theory, the new study by researchers from Sweden and Denmark suggested that the ancient ocean creature expansion started roughly 2 million years before the space rock bombardment.

New study suggests what causes mysterious fairy circles in Namib Desert

New study suggests what causes mysterious fairy circles in Namib Desert

The Namib Desert’s fairy circles, mysterious bare soil spots can be seen dotting the grasslands across 1,500 miles of the desert, are really well-coordinated as well as intelligent in design. These circles are also known for cropping up suddenly.

Scientists have long been struggling to determine what natural process causes these fairy circles, as factors like meteorite impact and huge raindrops have already been ruled out.

Primates facing extinction: researchers warn

Primates facing extinction: researchers warn

The future for primates like gorillas and chimps looks extremely gloomy unless humans make substantial shifts in their current behavior, according to a new research.

The new researcher revealed that nearly 60 per cent of the 504 species of primates are facing extinction. Three-quarters of the mankind’s closest biological relatives have suffered decline populations over the past few decades.

Researchers discover why killer whales go through menopause

Researchers discover why killer whales go through menopause

A new study by an international team of researchers has suggested that conflicts between mother and daughter killer whales may elucidate why the females of the species go through menopause.

The researchers sifted through more than forty years of data on killer whales in the northwest Pacific, and found that younger females are more likely to reproduce than their older counterparts.

They discovered that the trend discourages mother killer whales from reproduction, making them more focused on raising their younger members of their families instead.

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