Nature

Iconic penguin species could go extinct in less than 40 years

Iconic penguin species could go extinct in less than 40 years

An iconic penguin species found on the New Zealand mainland could go extinct in less than forty years unless an urgent action is taken, according to a peer reviewed study.

A team of researchers from the University of Otago found that the population of Yellow-eyed penguin on the New Zealand mainland is shrinking dramatically. Between 1996 and 2013, the species has lost more than 75 per cent of its population.

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Dogs Feel Jealous and Sulk: Researchers Prove What We Already Knew

Dogs Feel Jealous and Sulk: Researchers Prove What We Already Knew

Dogs feel jealous and this has been proved by research team at University of California at San Diego. Dogs need owner’s attention and jealousy is a strong motivating factor among pets. In the research, when the owners were showing affection towards a dog-like stuffed animal, real dogs showed aggression.

Many dog owners have told me the stories of their dog giving them a silent treatment. Many a times people tell that their dog feels jealous. This happens too often in families having more than one pet.

Emperor Penguins Relocate with Changing Temperatures

Emperor Penguins Relocate with Changing Temperatures

Scientists have reported in the past that emperor penguins return to the same location every year to make a nest. But a new research team from University of Minnesota (UM) has found evidence of penguins shifting their place.

The research team suggests that emperor penguins might be shifting their place due to global warming. The phenomenon also suggests that penguins are adapting well to the change in weather patterns. Also, the flightless birds are shifting their nesting place as an impact of melting ice sheets and changing environment.

Celtic Sea has its Own Population of Ocean Giants

Celtic Sea has its Own Population of Ocean Giants

A Pembrokeshire-based marine conservation group was able to spot giant fin whales in the Celtic Sea. Sea Trust along with Stena Line conducted a ferry-based survey between Rosslare in Ireland to Cherbourg in France.

Cliff Benson, Sea Trust Director, explained about the species they got to see on the route. They came across a large group of feeding fin whales. While talking about seeing the whales, Cliff Benson, Sea Trust Director, said they feel to be quite lucky as the weather was not so favourabvle.

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Japanese Sea Catfish uses pH Sensors to Catch Prey

Japanese Sea Catfish uses pH Sensors to Catch Prey

Many animals use unique and surprising techniques to outsmart their prey. Now, researchers have found that the Japanese sea catfish, Plotosus japonicus, is equipped with special sensors to detect its food. The technique used by the cat fish to catch its food involves noticing slight changes in the pH level of water with the help of natural sensor. Without sensors, it would be almost impossible to sight a prey in the murky water for Plotosus japonicas.

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Novel App Launched to report Spiked Lionfish in Florida

Novel App Launched to report Spiked Lionfish in Florida

With the advancement in field of science and technology, Florida State is using a new smartphone application, Report Florida Lionfish, to eradicate spiked lionfish from Florida. For the past 25 years, these invasive species have been creating havoc in Florida Waterways by preying on at least 70 different native invertebrates and fish.

Also, the species has voracious appetite and spawns at anytime in the year. Spiked Lionfish has originated from the Pacific and the Indian Oceans and they love to eat Nassau grouper, banded coral shrimp and yellowtail snapper.

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Ocean Waves lead to break up of Ice Sheets

Ocean Waves lead to break up of Ice Sheets

As per research team from New Zealand, the strong ocean waves have a bigger role to play in breaking up of ice sheets. The study has been published in Nature’s this week edition. The strong ocean waves reverberate across the ice sheets and lead to breaking up of the ice sheets.

After breakup, the parts of ice sheet start their journey towards water, which leads to further melting. There is a difference between the Ice sheets and Ice shelves and ice sheets of more prone to melting. Ice sheets form a thick layer of ice above the ocean surface.

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Fruits Flies use their Brain before taking Decisions

Fruits Flies use their Brain before taking Decisions

Researchers at the University of Oxford have revealed that fruit flies use their brain to take decisions before navigating, almost in a similar fashion to human brain. Fruit flies make conscious decisions and can spend longer deliberating over the more difficult of them, said researchers.

Main aim of conducting the study was to find out cognitive processes in small insects so as to have better understanding of human mind. In the experiment, researchers exposed fruit flies to two different odors: one the dangerous level and other a lot weaker.

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Kiwis have Closest Relation with Madagascar Elephant Bird

Kiwis have Closest Relation with Madagascar Elephant Bird

On performing DNA analysis of New Zealand's famed kiwi, a shy chicken-sized flightless bird, and the flightless elephant bird of Madagascar, scientists at the University of Adelaide have found closest relation between two bird species. Despite of having difference in sizes, body shape and lifestyle of both the birds, researchers found close genetic link to kiwis. Earlier, it was believed that the kiwi's closest relatives were the emu and the cassowary.

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Prosthetic Pair of Fins Help Injured Green Sea Turtle

Prosthetic Pair of Fins Help Injured Green Sea Turtle Recover

Israeli team of researchers has designed a new pair of prosthetic fins that helped green sea turtle, Hofesh, to recover from his injuries. Hofesh was found by researchers in fishing net off Israel's Mediterranean coast in early 2009 in a very critical condition.

The two left flippers of the sea turtle were badly wounded with a need for researchers to amputate the turtle. Earlier, they inserted a pair of stumps to the turtle, but it made the turtle more paralyzed and left him unable to swim.

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