Health

J&J to challenge $195M talc verdicts in appeals court

J&J to challenge $195M talc verdicts in appeals court

Insisting that its talc-based products are harmless, Johnson & Johnson (J&J) has decided to challenge jury verdicts that declared the products harmful and ordered the company to compensate victims with millions of dollars.

On Oct. 27th, a California woman, who alleged that J&J’s baby powder caused her ovarian cancer, won a $67.5 million jury verdict against the company. It was the third consecutive trial defeat suffered by the company in the recent past.

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Two Park City teens’ deaths were caused by synthetic opioid ‘Pink’: police

Two Park City teens’ deaths were caused by synthetic opioid ‘Pink’: police

The deaths of two teens in the Utah ski-resort town of Park City in September were caused by “acute drug intoxication” from a synthetic opioid known as “Pink,” local police officials confirmed on Thursday.

Park City Police officials said in a press release that toxicology tests conducted by the Utah Medical Examiner’s Office revealed that that both teens died from the synthetic opioid Pink, which is also known as U-47700.

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Pap smear can reveal genetic disorders in early pregnancy: researchers say

Pap smear can reveal genetic disorders in early pregnancy: researchers say

A simple Papanicolaou (Pap) smear can allow doctors to carryout prenatal screening for genetic disorders as early as five weeks into a pregnancy, according to a new research.

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U.S. premature birth rate jumps first time in 8 years in 2015

U.S. premature birth rate jumps first time in 8 years in 2015

The number of premature births in the U.S. increased for the first time in eight years in 2015, posing a new challenge to health authorities, according to the March of Dimes’ 2016 Premature Birth Report Card.

According to the report, the number of preterm births jumped from 9.57 per cent to 9.63 per cent of total births last year, as an additional 2,000 babies took preterm births in the country.

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Researchers find direct link between bedtime media device use & inadequate sleep

Researchers find direct link between bedtime media device use & inadequate sleep

Children and teenagers who use mobile devices like smartphones, tablets and computers at night lose sleep time as well as sleep quality, a new research cautioned.

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Cranberry products can’t cure UTIs: new research reveals

Cranberry products can’t cure UTIs: new research reveals

Once-promising cranberry cures are not as efficient in preventing or curing chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs) as many believe, a new research revealed.

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Medicare bars insurers from ‘seamless conversion’ of seniors’ health plans

Medicare bars insurers from ‘seamless conversion’ of seniors’ health plans

The Obama administration has temporarily blocked some health insurers from automatically moving eligible Medicare customers to Medicare Advantage plans as the controversial practice is being reviewed by federal officials.

A memo issued by Michael Crochunis, the acting director of the Medicare Enrollment & Appeals Group at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), also revealed that new rules will be issued for the so-called “seamless conversion” plans.

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Naturally-occurring bacteria to stop transmission of mosquito-borne illnesses

Naturally-occurring bacteria to stop transmission of mosquito-borne illnesses

Introducing a naturally-occurring bacterium in the wild can help control mosquito-borne diseases like zika and dengue; multiple small-scale observational trials conducted in various countries have shown.

In the trials conducted in Australia, Colombia and Vietnam, the researchers released mosquitoes infected with naturally occurring bacteria called Wolbachia, and found that it stopped viruses responsible for zika illness and dengue fever from growing inside the mosquitoes and thus spreading of the illnesses.

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CropLife criticizes IARC for calling 5 chemicals carcinogenic

CropLife criticizes IARC for calling 5 chemicals carcinogenic

CropLife America, which represents American pesticide manufacturers, has raised questions about the International Agency for Research on Cancer’s ((IARC’s) latest report that pointed to the cancer-causing potential of five chemicals.

IARC reviewed pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol (TCP), aldrin, dieldrin and 3, 3’, 4, 4’-tetrachloroazobenzene (TCAB), and warned that these chemicals can cause the deadly disease of cancer. The first four chemicals are pesticides that are no longer registered by EPA.

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Researchers find brain changes in young athlete after single football season

Researchers find brain changes in young athlete after single football season

Even a single season of football may affect certain aspects of the brain of a young athlete, a study conducted by researchers from multiple institutions suggested.

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