Health

Cigarette tax hike takes effect in California

Cigarette tax hike takes effect in California

Cigarette smokers in California will now have to fork out more in taxes as the state’s cigarette tax hike has taken effect, causing costs to surge by $2 per pack.

Smokers in the state will now pay $2.87 in taxes for every pack of cigarettes they purchase, more than triple the 87-cent tax levied on cigarette packs before the new tax took hold on 1st of April.

Jim Knox, of the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, welcomed the new tax hike, saying various studies have shown a strong correlation between higher tobacco taxes and lower rates of smoking.

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Missing Indonesian man found inside a python’s belly

Missing Indonesian man found inside a python’s belly

The body of an Indonesian man who went missing earlier this week was found near his own garden -- inside the tummy of a twenty-three feet long snake.

Akbar Salubiro, 25, had gone to harvest palm oil on his plantation on the Sulawesi Island on the recently past Sunday. After some time, villagers heard cries from the palm plantation, but they searched the field they found no person there.

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Scientists grow beating human heart cells on spinach leaves

Scientists grow beating human heart cells on spinach leaves

Making a potential breakthrough in the field of healthcare, a team of scientists has grown beating human heart cells on spinach leaves.

Scientists from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Arkansas State University-Jonesboro successfully grew beating heart tissue on leaves of spinach that were stripped of plant cells in a process known as decellularization.

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Monkey, piranha-eating people found to have lowest rates of heart disease

Monkey, piranha-eating people found to have lowest rates of heart disease

The Tsimane people, who live in thatched huts in an isolated corner of Bolivian jungle, have surprisingly the lowest rates of heart disease ever measured in the entire world.

Researchers believe that the secret of the Tsimane people’s lowest rates of heart disease might be in hidden in their unique diet. Their main meal often consists of monkey, capuchins or howlers. They also eat hog-nosed coons, a kind of wild pig called peccary, piranha and catfish.

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