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Doomsday Clock is now just 2½ minutes to ‘midnight’

Doomsday Clock is now just 2½ minutes to ‘midnight’

The Doomsday Clock has just advanced, virtually bringing earthlings just 2½ minutes to ‘midnight,’ the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists warned.

Scientists behind the so-called Doomsday Clock announced Thursday that it was adjusting the countdown to the “End of it All” by advancing the clock’s hands 30 seconds closer to midnight.

With just 2½ minutes to the midnight, the clock is now closest to the doomsday since 1953, when the U.S. had tested its first thermonuclear bomb and was followed by the Soviet Union’s hydrogen bomb test.

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Ancient, scary specimen placed in a new scientific order

Ancient, scary specimen placed in a new scientific order

A recently discovered well-preserved 100-million-year-old insect is so different from already identified more than one million insects that a new scientific order has been created to describe it.

The alien-looking specimen was discovered by a team of researchers from Oregon State University in semi-precious stone amber. It has a triangular head, almost-alien appearance along with so unusual features that scientists have called its discovery as "incredibly rare" event.

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U.S. Air Force’s missile-detection satellite successfully put in orbit

U.S. Air Force’s missile-detection satellite successfully put in orbit

The United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket successfully put the U.S. Air Force’s Space-Based Infrared System Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Satellite (SBIRS Geo-3) in high orbit, on its way to a surveillance post more than 22,000 miles above Earth’s surface.

The Atlas V rocket took off from Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 7:42 p.m. ET on Friday, and dropped off the missile detection and early warning satellite in orbit 44 minutes later.

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Opposition stalls end of protections for Yellowstone grizzly

Opposition stalls end of protections for Yellowstone grizzly

Opposition from dozens of American Indian tribes and wildlife conservation groups is discouraging federal officials from going ahead with their plans to end protections for hundreds of grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park.

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) had planned to finalize their decision to lift protections for nearly 700 grizzly bears by the end of 2016, but FWS Assistant Regional Director Michael Thabault recently announced that said it could take the agency at least six more months to finalize its decision.

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