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Scientists get a peep into early universe

Scientists get a peep into early universe

An international team of scientists claimed to have discovered a stardust-filled galaxy dubbed A2744_YD4, which is expected to provide the scientific community with a peep into the formation of the first stars in the universe.

Led by University College London's Nicolas Laporte, the scientists observed the A2744_YD4 galaxy using the European Southern Observatory's Chile-based Atacama Large Millimeter/sub millimeter Array.

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Nearly 4bn-year-old fossils might be earliest evidence of life on Earth

Nearly 4bn-year-old fossils might be earliest evidence of life on Earth

Straw-shaped microfossils discovered in ancient rocks in Canada could be evidence of some of the earliest life on Earth, a team of researchers led by biogeochemist Matthew Dodd reported.

Dodd, a biogeochemist at University College London, and colleagues said that the tiny, tubular structures or microfossils came from ancient microbes that existed on our planet nearly four billion years ago.

While the age of the specimens remains a matter of debate, most scientists believe that they are 3.77 billion years old, which make them the oldest ever found specimens.

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London exhibition charts 500 years of evolution of robots

London exhibition charts 500 years of evolution of robots

A soon-to-be opened exhibition in London will chart five hundred years of evolution of robots and organizers believe that that it will force people to think about how robots and autonomous technologies can enhance their lives.

Ben Russell, who charted the evolution of robots for the exhibit titled “Robots,” said robotic machines have been with humans for centuries as they can help a lot in making lives better.

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New citizen science project launched to prevent archaeological looting

New citizen science project launched to prevent archaeological looting

A newly launched citizen science project allows anyone to remotely analyze images of ancient archaeological sites captured from space, and discover their hidden secrets as well as protect them from looting and damage.

The new platform, dubbed GlobalXplorer, provides users with satellite pictures of Earth’s surface. Sarah Parcak, a space archaeologist from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said his project would enable anyone with Internet connection to analyze and keep an eye on archeological sites.

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